“We must expose and fight what is wrong.” ~Lino Brocka

Response Speech by Lino Brocka upon receiving the 1985 Ramon Magsaysay Award for Journalism, Literature and Creative Communication Arts

The filmmaker, like his peers in the other media, now realizes that the artist is also a public person. He no longer isolates himself from society. Instead of working in his ivory tower he is a citizen of the slums, of the streets, of the battlefields if need be. The artist is becoming a participant. He tries to be true, not only to his craft but also to himself. What he says on the screen, he also says in the streets. For it is the supreme duty of the artist to investigate the truth no matter what forces attempt to hide it. And then to report this truth to the people, to confront them with it. Like a whiplash it will cause wounds but will free the mind from the various fantasies and escapist fares with which “the establishment” pollutes our minds.

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CALL FOR ENTRIES | 4th Pandayang Lino Brocka Political Film and New Media Festival Video Plug

Inviting all Filipino students, amateur and independent film makers and film collectives to submit any original audio-video works produced from 2007 onwards with the theme HISTORY and SOCIAL CHANGE.

Submission of entries has been extended until June 30, 2012.

Click here for the festival’s rules and guidelines.

Lino Brocka: The Artist of the People

“The artist is always a participant. He tries to be true not only to his craft but also to himself. For it is the supreme duty of the artist to investigate the truth, no matter what forces attempt to hide it. And then to report it to the people, to confront them with it, like a whiplash that will cause wounds but will free the mind from the various fantasies and escapist fare that the Establishment pollutes our minds with. ” – Lino Brocka

Everyone is a chronicler of truth, but we cannot stop in being witnesses alone. Catalino Ortiz Brocka, or distinctively known as Lino Brocka might have other plans prior to his flourishing yet controversial career as a filmmaker, but he was not able to hamper his fervor and ability towards art.

Lino Brocka was born to a fisherman and a schoolteacher in Pilar, Sorsogon on April 7, 1939. He pursued a degree in English Literature at the University of the Philippines, and was an active member of UP Dramatic Club, from the time when he was eager in becoming an actor.

He graduated from high school with six medals, and attained a scholarship from University of The Philippines. However, he decided to leave his studies for missionary works. He became one of the first converts of Later Day Saints (LDS) in the country , and he served as a Mormon missionary in a leper colony of Hawaii, of island Molokai.

After his life as a faithful missionary, he began to thrive in directing and writing for both the stage and television. Brocka engaged in films that mainstream filmmakers have failed to depict: issues like poverty, oppression and corruption in the government.

His first film was in the year 1970, “Wanted: A Perfect Mother”, became an official entry to the 5th Manila Film Festival in 1970. Through his movie Insiang in 1976 that portrayed the marginalized sector during Marcos’ regime, his career as a filmmaker began to grow, where it internationally gained attention, despite the local government’s censorship.

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